About

Anya Topolski is an associate professor in ethics and political philosophy at the Radboud University Nijmegen. She obtained two bachelor degrees at McGill University in Montreal, Canada: BSc in Biochemistry (1999) and an BA Honours in Philosophy (2000). After a brief but memorable experience teaching in Korea, Anya moved to Belgium to complete a Masters in Continental Philosophy (Magna Cum Laude) specialising in the political thought of Hannah Arendt. She obtained her PhD in Philosophy at the KU Leuven, for which she was awarded the 2008 Auschwitz Foundation Stichting Prize , with a focus on the political thought of Hannah Arendt, the ethics of Emmanuel Levinas and contemporary Jewish thought.

In 2009, she joined an interdisciplinary NWO project as a post-doctoral researcher to consider the application of her theory of relationality in the field of military ethics where she engaged in post-Srebrenica research on responsibility and judgment. In 2012 her research on European Identity and Exclusion, antisemitism and islamophobia, was funded by FWO – Flanders. In addition she was a lecturer at the University of Kent in Brussels in political rhetoric and communication. In 2015 she became an assistant professor in political theory at the Faculty of Management at Radboud University, Nijmegen. In 2017 she received tenured as an assistant professor in ethics and political philosophy at the Faculty of Philosophy, Theology and Religious Studies at Radboud University, Nijmegen.

Her most recent books are: Arendt, Levinas and a Politics of Relationality (Rowman and Littlefield, 2015) and Is there a Judeo-Christian Tradition? A European Perspective (De Gruyter, 2016). Recent articles are: The Race-Religion Intersection: A European Contribution to the Critical Philosophy of Race (Critical Philosophy of Race, 2017); The Islamophobic Inheritance of the Resurrected Saint Paul: From F.C. Baur’s Judeo-Christianity to Badiou and Žižek’s Event. (ReOrient: The Journal of Critical Muslim Studies. Vol II, No. 1, Spring 2017); and Tzedakah: The True Religion of Spinoza’s Tractatus? (History of Political Thought, 2016, 37(1), pp. 78-106).

Her areas of expertise are: political philosophy, ethics, European identity and exclusion, racism, gender, antisemitism and islamophobia, political theology, Jewish thought, Arendt, Levinas, ‘Judeo-Christianity’.

 

Photo Credit: Duncan de Fey